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Northern California

Brad Stine: Building A Philosophy Through Tennis

<h2>Brad Stine: Building A Philosophy Through Tennis</h2>
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Brad Stine presented his coach, Cañada Community College’s Rich Anderson, when Anderson was inducted into the Hall of Fame. That was in 2014. Little did he know he’d be inducted in 2019.

 

His tennis journey started at the age of 14. Brad was an avid baseball player. He was recruited for his All-Star team and looked forward to the competition. As fate would have it, he broke his hand the day before the game. He couldn’t play baseball with his cast on, but he discovered he could bat a tennis ball around one-handed. Thus, his love of tennis was born.

 

 

Brad racked up accolades and awards throughout his tennis years. His team from Cañada earned the state championship in 1978. He earned a tennis scholarship to Fresno State for two years. By 1982, he served as Assistant Coach for the Fresno State Men’s Tennis team and spent his summers playing tennis in Europe. ADVERTISEMENT By 1985, Brad became the youngest head coach in the country. Around that time, he connected with Greg Patton, the head coach for the US National Junior Davis Cup Team. He joined Greg and the team as Assistant Coach and began working with top junior players who later became pros, including Jim Courier, Pete Sampras and Michael Chang.

 

By 1988, Brad continued to coach with USTA during his summers. He noted his “luck” to work with and travel with his mentor, Tom Gullickson for 16 weeks. The Fresno team continued to grow; they were ranked in the top 25 teams in the country for three years in a row. In 1990 and 1991, Brad was named Big West Coach of the Year.

 

Brad became Jim Courier’s coach from 1991 to 1994. During this time, Courier reach No. 1 ATP, won two French Opens, two Australian Opens and participated in four Grand Slam Finals.

 

In May 1994, Brad began coaching Andrei Medvedev, who was ranked in the top 10 ATP and won one title. In 1995, Brad coached Jonathan Stark, who was No. 1 ATP Doubles with Byron Black and won a singles title in Singapore, 1996. In 1997 to 2000, Brad returned to coaching Jim Courier. After Courier retired, Brad coached Mardy Fish, who went from 365 to 126 in the ATP rankings. After working with Mardy, Brad coached Taylor Dent from 2002 to 2003. This was credited as Taylor’s most successful year on tour, including winning a singles title. In 2005 to 2007, Brad worked with Sebastien Grosjean, who reached Top 25 ATP ranking and the quarterfinals in the Australian Open and Wimbledon.

 

After his storied pro coaching career, Brad directed his 360 Tennis Academy in Fresno, CA, for several years. In October 2014, Brad made the move to Orlando, FL, to work full time with the USTA. But in 2017, the pros called again when he began coaching Kevin Anderson. Kevin went from No. 15 to No. 5 ATP, made his first appearance at ATP finals and won two titles.

 

Brad credits his success in coaching to mentors like Greg Patton, Rich Anderson, Tom Gullickson and Jose Higueras. “I’ve been lucky to have amazing mentors help me develop my philosophy and coaching techniques,” Brad said. Working in vastly different environments and circumstances, like college to pro teams, honed his philosophy—"working through hard times, facing all confrontations, navigating through them is what guides us to our great moments.”

 

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