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WHAT'S THE CALL?

DROPPING YOUR RACQUET

December 29, 2016
<h2>WHAT'S THE CALL?</h2>
<h1>DROPPING YOUR RACQUET</h1>

Have you ever had a dispute with a fellow player over a call on the court that you couldn’t settle? Maybe you’re just curious about how some scenarios, from the common to the ridiculous, are resolved.


Question: During a tournament doubles match, my partner dropped her racquet in the middle of a point. I was able to back her up and get to the next ball while she recovered, picked up her racquet and moved back into position. Could our opponents have called a let and restarted the point or claimed it based on being hindered?

 

Answer: Dropping a racquet is not grounds for a let to be called or for someone to claim a hindrance. Dropping the racquet is considered not to be “sufficiently unusual” for hindrance or let to be called. A similar situation is reference in "Friend at Court" in USTA Comment 22.1: Dropping the racquet is not the same thing as a ball falling out of a pocket or a hat flying off.

 

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For the "Friend at Court" handbook and more information on the rules of tennis, visit the rules and regulations homepage.

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