This is the membership endpoints html.
Client Id
Client Secret
PB Error Codes
getcategories
getproducts
accesstoken
catalogId
catalogVersionId
categoryId
viewCart
deleteCart
addToCart
retrieveMembersDetails
getMemberInfo
unlinkMember
submitNewMemberInfo
updateCustomerDetails
traditionalUpdateCustomerDetails
paymentDetails
createOrganization
addFacility
addVoucher
removeVoucher
validateAddress
setDefaultPayment
getOrganization
orders
organizationSuggestion
facilitySuggestion
deleteCard
resetPassword
signInByUaid
recoveryEmail
customerEmailUpdate
traditionalLogin
signInByProfile
updateSignInProfile
addCard
addEcheck
removeEcheck
setDefaultPaymentInfo
unsubscribe
editFacility
unlinkFacility
editOrganization
duplicateCustomerValidation
getSection
refreshToken
National

PLAY TENNIS IN

SCHOOLS

July 14, 2017
<h2>PLAY TENNIS IN</h2>
<h1>SCHOOLS</h1>
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Whether your child is picking up a tennis racquet in elementary school for the first time or looking to continue their passion for the sport while earning college credits, there are plenty of play opportunities.

 

From elementary to high school, tennis can be played at any age and is open to all levels of play. Youngsters can ask their teachers about how they can start playing in their PE class, or whether there are after-school programs they can join.

 

PE classes offer the perfect setup for introducing tennis in schools – through supported curriculum and enthusiastic coaches, all played in a familiar setting where children are surrounded by friends and peers of a similar age. This can then be extended further through after-school tennis clubs and creating an extracurricular program that is open to all students.

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Outside of the classroom, there are various other opportunities for elementary- and high school-aged children, including Junior Team Tennis, which offers both a competitive and non-competitive track depending on the ability and needs of the individual player.

 

You can also encourage schools to develop relationships with local community partners such as Community Tennis Assocaitions (CTAs) and National Junior Tennis and Learning (NJTL) networks to grow exposure and opportunities to play tennis outside of the school day.

 

Want to get involved with coaching tennis in schools and help shape the next generation of student-athletes? Learn more here. And remember, tennis players are good students and community citizens. More than 80 percent of tennis players attend college as well as volunteer in their local communities.


Best of all, tennis doesn’t have to stop after high school. Students can continue playing into college with varsity-level tennis or with Tennis On Campus intramural play.

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