8370-YouthTennis_Graphics_findevent_200x190
Live Scores and Results
 

2014 US Open Long Sleeve Shirt

2014 US Open Patriotic Shirt

2014 US Open Women's Shirt

2014 US Open Hat

2014 US Open Men's Pullover Jacket

Jumbo Tennis Ball

2014 US Open Tennis Balls

2014 US Open Shirt

2014 US Open Polo Shirt
 

Double Bounces

Q. I'm aware that for a double bounce it is the opponents call on if it did or didn't bounce twice before he hit it, however how is it to be treated if you ask the opponent, and they say that they are not sure if it bounced twice before they got it back? The thing is we were not sure how to proceed because he was uncertain and I didn't put it away when he returned it, so we just played a let. If the opponent is not certain it was hit before two bounces, should he assume it was two bounces?

A. If the player does not make the call, play should continue. In your case, you stopped and asked, and the opponent said that he was not sure.

Since he did not say one way or the other that it was two bounces, you cannot then assume it was two bounces. Therefore you should lose the point since you stopped play. He was being kind by offering you a let. It is his call to make, not yours.

Q. Please tell me who is supposed to call two bounces on a return shot?

A. Players call 'not up' (2 bounces) on themselves. If they do not call it on themselves, or their doubles partner does not call it, no one else can make the call.

Q. I was playing singles and hit a short shot, we both came up to the net. I clearly saw the double bounce and saw her hit the ball on the second bounce. My opponent argued that she hit the ball on the first bounce. What should I do at that point as I felt it was clearly a double bounce?

A. The person who hits the ball is responsible for calling a double bounce against themselves. It is not their opponents call to make.You can ask that player if they are certain of that call. However, again, it is up to that player to make that call.

Q. Yesterday I was playing doubles and was on the baseline when they hit a dropshot. I saw it early enough to get there and hit a winner. The ball bounced twice on their side but after that I lost my balance and ran into the net. I conceded the point to them but my partner said that since the ball bounced twice on their side that it ended the point and the net was not a factor after that. I find some credibility in his assessment and it has me wondering if he could be correct. What's the official ruling here.

A: Your partner is correct. Once the ball has bounced twice or hit a permanent fixture, the point is over and running into the net is not an issue.























 
Print Article Email Article Newsletter Signup Share

In This Section:

Click here to send your burning questions about the rules of tennis along with your name and town.

Knowledge Areas: 

 
 
 
USTA Membership
Learn More or Login
Learn More or Login
Espanol
 
Newsletter Signup
 
 
 
 

Copyright 2014 by United States Tennis Association. All Rights Reserved.

Online Advertising | Site Map | About Us | Careers | Internships | Contact Us | Terms of Use | Umpire Policy | Privacy Policy

Connect with us! Facebook-38x39 Twitter-38x39 Youtube-38x39