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Roddick, Flink, Braden

Inducted to Tennis Hall of Fame 

Erin Maher  |  July 22, 2017
<h1>Roddick, Flink, Braden</h1>
<h2>Inducted to Tennis Hall of Fame </h2>
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On Saturday, tennis legend and former world No. 1 Andy Roddick was inducted into the Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport, R.I.

 

Alongside Roddick, fellow compatriots Steve Flink, an esteemed tennis journalist and historian, and Vic Braden, the revered tennis instructor, were honored for their work and impact on the game. Three-time US Open champion Kim Clijsters and four-time Dutch Paralympic medalist Monique Kalkman-van den Bosch were also honored in the celebration.

 

Nebraska-native Roddick captured the crown and the hearts of America in 2003 when the then-21-year-old trumped Juan Carlos Ferrero in the US Open final. Equipped with a wicked forehand and serve almost as big as his personality, Roddick went on to become the leading man in U.S. tennis. Besides his US Open trophy, Roddick captured 32 tour crowns and was a fan favorite, as his matches were punctuated with his quick humor and megawatt smile. 

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Throughout his storied 12-year career, Roddick spent 13 weeks ranked No. 1 – securing the year-end top spot in 2013 – and finished nine straight years in the ATP Top 10 rankings, from 2002 to 2010. He won the US Open Series championship in 2005 and 2006 and secured five Masters 1000 crowns.

 

Roddick went on to appear in four more Grand Slam tournament finals, again at the US Open in 2006 and three times at Wimbledon, ultimately thwarted each time by longtime rival Roger Federer. He is the last American man to have won a Grand Slam tournament.

 

Roddick was also an integral part of the U.S. Davis Cup team. He was instrumental in the 2007 defeat of Russia for the U.S.’s 32nd Davis Cup victory and ranks second on the all-time U.S. Davis Cup list with 33 singles victories (trailing only John McEnroe’s 41).

 

Since his retirement in 2012, Roddick has been promoting his nonprofit the Andy Roddick Foundation – the eponymous foundation offers enrichment programs for kids outside of the classroom that provides growth opportunities in literacy, STEM, art and sports – and has stayed active in the world of tennis, competing in WorldTeam Tennis and PowerShares Series events.

 

"I'm not the best of all time," Roddick said to the crowd in his acceptance speech. "I'm not going to win Wimbledon. I'm not the best of my generation. I'm not the most well-behaved. I'm not the most polished. ... I may not be a lot of things, but from this day forward I'll never be anything less than a Hall of Famer."

 

Award-winning journalist and lifelong tennis enthusiast Flink turned his love of tennis into a career. He is one of the world’s foremost historians of the sport, having covered tennis for the past four decades. His tennis journey took off in the early 1970s when he was writing for World Tennis Magazine. He has since gone on to write, edit and commentate for a plethora of other outlets including Tennis Week, ESPN, CBS Radio, USOpen.org and tennischannel.com.

 

"I'm a journalist first and foremost," said Flink. "But a part of me remains fundamentally and unabashedly a tennis fan. I stand here today immensely humble, exhilarated and gratified by this ineffable accolade." 

 

Coach extraordinaire Braden, who died in 2014, was one of the world’s preeminent instructors and vanguards for the study of physics in the game of tennis. He developed and shaped the skills of some major legends on the court, including two-time US Open champion Tracy Austin.

 

Braden also co-founded the Coto Sports Research Center and the Vic Braden Tennis colleges. He served as a professor at UCLA and was a contributor to many tennis publications, including Tennis Magazine. Braden also produced a series of tennis training materials that have impacted coaches and recreational players across the country.

 

***

 

In semifinal play Saturday at the Hall of Fame Championships in Newport, John Isner ended Bjorn Fratangelo's run in the semifinals, defeating his fellow American, 6-2, 6-4. Isner will play unseeded Australian Matthew Ebden Sunday aiming for his third Newport crown and first ATP title since 2015. 

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