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Southwest

ALL ABOUT TENNIS JUNIOR PROFILE: 
Anya and Madeline Lamoreaux (Mesa, Arizona)

USTA Southwest  |  March 2, 2018
<h3>ALL ABOUT TENNIS JUNIOR PROFILE:&nbsp;<br>
Anya and Madeline Lamoreaux (Mesa, Arizona)</h3>
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Spending a lifetime together on an off a tennis court usually creates an unshakable, unbreakable bond. It’s likely a huge reason why tennis players with familial connections share a spirit for the game that often drives them both to success either solo or together. 

Think of the most successful tennis families out on tour right now, the Williams Sisters, the Murray Brothers, the Bryan Brothers, the Pliskova Sisters, the Zverev brothers, the Radwanska Sisters. They share a similar innate wavelength in their brains, common training strategies and routines, and hey, they just always have a ready-to-go practice partner that helped them get to where they are. 

In the Southwest, there are plenty of sibling pairs rocking it together on the court, but the current most successful sibling duo are the Lamoreaux’s of Mesa, Arizona, a twin-billing, volley-killing, lefty-righty girls' doubles machine. ADVERTISEMENT Anya is the right-hander with the always-flying ponytail and is a whole minute older by birth, while Madeline (‘Maddie’), the younger, is the lefty with the crazy spins.   

The Lamoreaux's have been on the tennis grind in the Southwest since 2009, when both of them, oddly enough, had to square off against one another in their very first matches ever, at 11 years old at the USTA Central Arizona Junior Super Set.  The two have battled it out many times since on the singles court, but their biggest successes have come on the doubles court together.

Astonishingly in nearly 10 years of competitive USTA tennis, they've combined to play almost 1200 matches. Even their overall career USTA records are eerily similar (Anya 377-244, Maddie 336-242).

Next year, both will head off to college, though this time, without their other half (Anya has committed to play at the University of Utah, while Maddie will take her talents to Eastern Washington, her parents’ alma mater). The girls are looking forward what this next chapter in their tennis lives reveals as solo operators, though they know their sisterly bond will always remain tighter than their tennis strings.

We caught up with the Lamoreaux's after the pair came off back-to-back doubles wins in January and February at the Jeff Myers Memorial L4 and the Phoenix Junior Open to see how they keep their worlds apart and what having a twin sister is like both on and away from the court.
 

USTASW: What has been your best tournament experience since you started competing?
Maddie: My best tournament experience has been when I got to play a doubles match at 11:00 pm. This way really fun because I have always wanted to play a tennis match so late at night.
Anya: All the team events we get to play in are fun to be a part of just because it’s exciting to be a part of a team where we are all competing for the same thing. It’s just a cool environment to be a part of something where everyone cheers for each other.

USTASW: How did you two get started in tennis? Was it an easy thing to do together?
M: Tennis was really the only sport I've ever really enjoyed. I've quit all of the other ones.
A: Every sport I had played prior to tennis, it was kind of the same story, I got bored from. I was playing softball and after two seasons of it, I no longer enjoyed playing it. After talking to my mom about it, she signed me up for tennis.

USTASW: What was your very first USTA tournament? How old were you? How did you feel approaching the match?
M: The very first USTA match I remember playing was when I was 11, and I lost. I remember feeling excited because that was the first time I experienced a competitive tennis match. It made me excited because I knew I wanted to play more competitive matches, and get better at tennis.

A: The first USTA tournament I remember playing was against my sister when I was 11. I’m sure there were matches before, but for some reason I can only remember playing my sister. I remember feeling neutral before the match. I wasn’t super excited to play my sister, but I wasn’t mad about it.

 

USTASW: What is your ultimate goal with tennis?
M: My ultimate goal with tennis is to become the best tennis player I can be, and to just continue having fun.
A: My ultimate goal with tennis is to become a solid college player.

 

USTASW: What college have you committed to play for and why did you choose that school?
M: I committed to Eastern Washington University because they had a great team atmosphere, and I really like the coach. Also, both of my parents went to Eastern Washington University.
A: I have committed to play tennis for the University of Utah. I chose Utah because they have an amazing facility, and I love the coach; I think there is a lot I can learn from the coach.

 

USTASW: What do you most like to do when you're not playing tennis?
M:  I like to watch movies, and just relax at home.
A: When I am not playing tennis, I like to hang out with my friends and go shopping.

 

USTASW: Who is the older sister?
M: She is.
A: Yes, by one minute. I’m the more experienced, wiser one.

 

USTASW: Who is your favorite tennis professional?  What would you do if you were to meet them?
M: My favorite player is Nick Kyrgios because when I met him he was nice. 
A: My favorite tennis professional is Roger Federer. If I were to meet him, I would definitely ask him for a picture.

 

USTASW: How often do you two play tennis each week and what do you do to try to keep your practices fun?
Both girls: We play 5-6 days a week. And…Music at practice!

 

USTASW: Who or what has been your biggest role model or help in learning tennis?
M: My mom has been my greatest role model because she has sacrificed so much for me. She taught me the importance of working hard, and seeing my mom work hard has motivated me to work hard.
A: My biggest role model in helping me with my tennis is my mom because she encourages me to push myself to the best of my ability.

 

USTASW: What's been your best or favorite tennis moment so far in your young career?
M: My best tennis moment would be signing the NLI to play college tennis. That is when I felt like all of my hard work has paid off.
A: My favorite tennis moment was clinching a big doubles point with my sister last year at the USTA Girls’ 18s team event.

 

USTASW: Do you have any odd quirks or rituals on the court, like bouncing a ball five times before a serve or not walking on the lines?
M: Not really.
A: I do not have any specific quirks on court, but I am superstitious so once I start doing a specific action such as patting my thigh before the point, I do not change that during the match.

 

USTASW: Do you girls think you were destined to play tennis together just because of being twins?
M: I don’t really know if you would say destined, but we are lucky to have each other.
A: I don’t think we were destined to play together because of the twin thing. We actually fought a lot in our doubles matches when we first started playing with each other, but as we got older we learned to play doubles better with each other and that made us more consistent. Think we learned how to work with one another more.

USTASW: Have you girls played with other doubles partners much. How does that go?
M: I’ve had fun playing with other doubles partners and really enjoyed it.
A: Yeah, Maddie and I have played doubles with different partners before. It’s different because we kind of know how to balance each other’s games out in doubles, so when we play with someone else it’s hard to find that same trust and balance with them right away.

USTASW: Twins are known for their commonalities. In what ways would you guys say you girls are alike and in what ways are you different?
M: We’re both into restaurants and going out to eat. I’m more of a TV and Netflix kind of person and maybe enjoy being a bit more to myself when I’m off the court.  
A: Away from tennis we are alike in the that both of us are major foodies, so we are always trying new places to eat. We are different in the way we like to relax. I like to hang out with friends and relax.

USTASW: What’s it going to be like next year when you girls are at separate colleges and both away from one another for the first time?
M: It will surely be a change without her around as much, but it will be good for us both. We can learn to be more independent and grow as individuals.
A: Next year will definitely be different without my sister, but I think it will be a good different for both of us. It’s a new experience that I know I’m looking forward to.
 
LAMOREAUX FILE
- Both are ranked among the Top 10 in USTA Southwest (Maddie No. 9 in Girls 18s singles, Anya No. 10)
- Both have played for USTA Southwest on the Girls’ 18s National Team Championships
- Between them have played almost 1200 career USTA matches

 


ALL ABOUT TENNIS has been a proud and longtime sponsor of USTA Southwest tennis programs, and is the largest retail tennis store in the Southwest. Open since 1992, the store is run, managed and owned by a tennis playing family.

To find out more about All About Tennis, visit them at their store in the heart of Scottsdale, online at allabouttennis.com on TwitterFacebook or e-mail allatennis@aol.com


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