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National

Adult NTRP Ratings

Questions & Answers 

January 1, 2018
<h1>Adult NTRP Ratings</h1>
<h2>Questions &amp; Answers </h2>
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What is NTRP?

Developed in 1978, the National Tennis Rating Program (NTRP) is a classification system that identifies and describes general characteristics of tennis-playing ability. The NTRP General Characteristics Guide outlines the abilities of each level from 1.5 (beginner) through 7.0 (touring pro). Generally, USTA League offers programs for the 2.5 through 5.0 levels. 

 

Click here for NTRP level-by-level informational videos for the recreational tennis player. 

 

NTRP RATING 

 

What is an NTRP rating and what are the different categories of ratings?  

 

An NTRP rating is a numerical indicator of tennis-playing ability, from 1.5 (beginner) through 7.0 (touring pro), which aligns with a set of general characteristics that breaks down the skills and abilities of each level, in .5 increments. Ratings are generated by play in USTA League Adult Divisions of 18 & Over, 40 & Over, 55 & Over, Adult 65 & Over and Mixed 18 & Over and USTA Sanctioned Tournaments in some Sections and additional leagues that Sections may choose to include in rating calculations. ADVERTISEMENT Ratings help establish a player’s NTRP skill level after only a few matches and do not change dramatically.  Rather, they slowly increase or decrease over time as they reflect consistent player skill level as exhibited through play results.   

 

NTRP CALCULATION 

 

How does the year-end NTRP calculation work?  (Also in Year-end)

Computerized ratings are affected by the score of a match as well as your partner’s and your opponent’s dynamic NTRP rating. Based on player dynamic ratings at the start of a match, the NTRP algorithm expects a particular outcome of a match. The actual outcome is then compared to the expected outcome and, as a result, a player’s dynamic rating adjusts up or down (or there is no change, if the outcome was as expected.) Computerized ratings are not directly affected by what position you played, your actual number of wins and losses, age, or team standing.

 

START RATING

A player’s previous valid year-end rating to the hundredth used as the first calculation in averaging dynamic ratings for matches in the current championship year.   

 

COMPUTER RATING

 

Computer (C) (Also in Year-End)   

A computer rating, also known as year-end rating, refers to a player’s rating generated by their participation in USTA League Adult Divisions of 18 & Over, 40 & Over or 55 & Over and other play as applicable during the course of a year, generally Nov. 1 – Oct. 31. The term “rating” is most often used to refer to a rating generated by this play but can also include USTA Sanctioned Tournament play and other leagues as determined by the Section. A year-end rating is an NTRP Level assigned at the conclusion of the league championship which reflects a player’s ability level determined by a mathematical algorithm. A player’s year-end rating, published each December, is used to determine which USTA League(s) they are eligible to participate in the following year. Year-end ratings are valid for up to three years for players 59 or under or two years for players 60 and over or until another rating is generated. 

 

Mixed (M) (Also in Mixed)

A mixed (M) rating is generated by a player who only participates in a USTA League Mixed Division(s). If a player also participates in a USTA League Adult Division(s) and plays at least three matches, they will generate a valid computer rating (C) instead of a mixed rating.

 

Tournament (T) (Also in Tournament)

A tournament rating is generated by a player who only participates in USTA sanctioned tournament play. If a player also participates in USTA League Adult Division play and plays at least three matches, they will generate a valid computer rating (C) and it will take precedence over their tournament rating.   

 

OTHER RATING CATEGORIES:

 

Disqualified (D) (Also in Disqualification)

A self-rated player can receive a disqualified rating by either receiving a dynamic disqualification or having a grievance filed against them. 

 

A dynamic disqualification is defined as a self-rated player that has generated three dynamic ratings in a single calendar year, based on USTA League Adult Division play (except retirements and through to Sectional Championships), that are clearly above their current computer-rating level, regardless of the championship year in which the matches take place. An NTRP Grievance is a formal written complaint regarding an alleged violation of a regulation or procedure. (from regulations). Players that receive an NTRP Grievance will receive a disqualified rating.

 

Appeal (A) (Also in Appeals)

A player receives an appealed rating when they are granted a request to play at a higher or lower level of play. Types of appeals include: medical appeals, automatic appeals and committee reviewed appeals.

 

Self Rating (S) (Also in Self-Rating)

A self rating is an entry-level rating generated upon a player, either a new player or a player re-entering the USTA League Adult Division with a M (mixed) or T (tournament) rating, completing the USTA Self-Rate Questionnaire. To participate in USTA League, all players must have a valid computer rating or self-rating. The USTA Self-Rate Questionnaire is available on TennisLink.com. 

 

Dynamic (Also in Dynamic)

A dynamic rating is generated at the conclusion of a player's most recently completed USTA League Adult Division match. Dynamic ratings are calculated to the hundredths of a point and are not published. A dynamic rating may be calculated after each match and it may change with each match played.   Matches played against players that are self-rated do not generate dynamic ratings until a self-rated player has enough results from matches against other players who have dynamic ratings.

 

What is an NTRP Promotion? (Also in Disqualification)

If a self-rated player competes only at a higher level, they will be disqualified from their self-rated level and moved up to the higher level of competition. No other penalties will be imposed. 

 

What is a Year-End Rating? (Also in Year-End) 

A year-end rating, also known as a computer-rating, refers to a player’s rating generated by their participation in USTA League Adult Divisions of 18 & Over, 40 & Over or 55 & Over and other play as applicable during the course of a year, generally Nov. 1 – Oct. 31. The term “rating” is most often used to refer to a rating generated by this play but can also include USTA Sanctioned Tournament play and other leagues as determined by the Section. A year-end rating is an NTRP Level assigned at the conclusion of the league championship which reflects a player’s ability level determined by a mathematical algorithm. A player’s year-end rating, published each December, is used to determine which USTA League(s) they are eligible to participate in following year. Year-end ratings are valid for up to three years for players 59 or under or two years for players 60 and over or until another rating is generated. 

 

How does a player achieve an NTRP Year-End rating? (Also in Year-End)

A player receives a year-end rating by playing at least three valid matches in Leagues or included Tournaments, or both. A valid match is defined as a team match in which a majority of the individual matches played by the two competing teams have completed at least six games. 

 

What is the USTA Rating Year? (Also in Year-End)

The USTA rating year is used to define the limits of data collection for the purpose of calculating a year-end rating for all participating players. It runs from the prior year’s ending collection date through the end of the last Adult 18 & Over, Adult 40 & Over and Adult 55 & Over National Championship. The exact date varies from year to year based on National Championship dates.

 

Are all players in a given NTRP level equal in ability?

No. The NTRP system identifies general levels of ability, but an individual player will be dynamically rated within those levels at 50 different hundredths of a point. For example, a 3.5 player can fall anywhere between a 3.01 and a 3.50. This may be why some players feel they are frequently defeated by players of the same level, especially when they have recently been promoted; this is because they are closer to the bottom of that range while their opponents are closer to the top of the range.

 

If my NTRP level of play is not available in my local league, what are my options?

● Play up one level. 

● File an appeal to determine if you are within the appeal range.

● Work with your local or district league coordinator to establish a new league at that level.

● Play in a league that offers combined ratings.

● Play USTA NTRP sanctioned tournaments.

● Play in an Adult Social League if offered in your area.

 

What is a NTRP Disqualification? (Also in Disqualification)

A NTRP Disqualification is a rule enforcement against a player who is generating dynamic ratings high enough sufficient to indicate that the player is playing at a level that is too low for their ability.  Dynamics indicating that a player is out of level are called “strikes”, and at least three strikes will result in a Dynamic Disqualification.  

 

What is an NTRP Promotion? (Also in Disqualification)

If a self-rated player competes at a higher level, they will be disqualified from their self-rated level and moved up to the higher level of competition. No other penalties will be imposed.  

 

What is the difference between a rating and a ranking? (Also in Tournament)

A rating is a number assigned to a player that reflects their level of playing ability. A ranking reflects the relative position of strength based on other players on the rankings list and is only achieved through tournament play.

   

Tournament

 

What is a Tournament Rating? (Also in Definitions)

A tournament rating is generated by a player who only participates in USTA sanctioned tournament play. If a player also participates in USTA League Adult Division play and plays at least three matches, they will generate a valid computer rating (C) and it will take precedence over their tournament rating.    

 

What is the difference between a rating and a ranking? (Also in Definitions)

A rating is a number assigned to a player that reflects their level of playing ability. A ranking reflects the relative position of strength based on other players on the ranking list and is only achieved through tournament play.  

 

How do "tournament rankings" compare to ratings?  My “Tournament Ranking” had me ranked pretty high.  How does that correlate with my NTRP Rating? (Also in Year-End)

Tournament rankings are based on “points per round” in tournament play. A player could do very well in tournaments and achieve a high ranking but their ranking will have no bearing on their NTRP rating. 

Sections may opt IN or OUT of including sanctioned tournament results in their NTRP rating calculations. If a Section opts IN, NTRP sanctioned tournament matches are calculated into year-end ratings. In this case, tournament matches could have a direct effect on your rating.  Note: Being “ranked” high does not mean your rating will go up to the next level. It simply means that you received more “points” in the ranking criteria than other players.

 

Do tournament matches count more or less for my year-end rating than league matches? (Also in Year-End)

If a Section has opted to include tournament play in their NTRP ratings, tournament results count the same as league matches.

 

Do all tournaments count toward my rating? (Also in Year-End)

No. Currently, age-division tournaments are not included. Age-division tournaments are not included because they are open to all players of the specified age and are not restricted to skill level. Also, Sections have the ability to “Opt In” or “Opt Out” of certain tournaments categories. Check with your Local League Coordinator or Section League Coordinator to obtain the information in your specific Section.    

 

Can I use my Tournament rating to play in other Divisions?  (Also in Year-End)

A Tournament-exclusive rated player who chooses to participate in the USTA League Adult Division must self-rate in order to play. A Tournament-exclusive rating is not supported by any NTRP calculation data and is subject to NTRP grievances.   

 

Do USTA sanctioned tournaments count in the dynamic rating system? If so, can a tournament win be used as one of the three “strikes”? (Also in Dynamic and Disqualification)

Each Section has the option of including NTRP tournament results for year-end calculations. Sanctioned NTRP tournament results do not generate strikes; however, if your Section does Opt In, they will impact your year-end rating. 

 

If I only play Mixed Doubles in Tournaments, what kind of a year-end rating will I achieve? (Also in Year-End)

You will receive an “M” rating if you only play mixed doubles. 

 

Mixed Exclusive

 

What is a Mixed Exclusive rating? (Also in Definitions)

A mixed-exclusive rating is generated by a player who only participates in the USTA League Mixed Division and does not have a valid year-end rating generated by Adult Division play. If a player has a valid computer rating (C) from the Adult Division play, it will take precedence over a mixed division rating. 

 

How does a Mixed Exclusive player get a rating? (Also in Year-End)

If a sufficient number of Mixed Doubles matches are played, the player will receive a year-end mixed rating (M) that will be used as their NTRP play level for the next year for mixed league eligibility. 

 

Can I use my mixed-exclusive rating to play in other divisions? (Also in Year-End) 

A mixed-exclusive (M) player must self-rate in order to join the Adult Division.  A mixed-exclusive rating is a minimum NTRP start level only and is not supported by any NTRP dynamic disqualification calculation data and is subject to NTRP grievance.

 

Is my adult NTRP rating affected by playing mixed doubles? (Also in Year-End)

Mixed Doubles Division results will only have an effect on the ratings of players who play exclusively Mixed Doubles.

 

Does a dynamic calculation apply to Mixed Division play? (Also in Dynamic and Disqualification)

Yes, for players who participate exclusively in the Mixed Doubles Division. Mixed results will not be included in year-end rating calculations for those who play a sufficient number of matches in any Adult Division. 

 

The rules state that NTRP Dynamic Disqualification does not apply to the Mixed Division. If I am dynamically disqualified in the Adult Division, am I allowed to participate at the disqualified level in the Mixed Division for the remainder of the League Year? (Also in Dynamic and Disqualification)

No. Even though the Mixed Division does not allow NTRP Dynamic Disqualification, it must follow the rules in relation to playing at the correct level. A player who has been moved up as a result of a disqualification in the Adult Division must immediately adjust his/her NTRP level of play in the Mixed Division. The player will have two options:

        • If a combined NTRP level team, he/she may continue on that team by adjusting the levels. (9.0 combined team—disqualified 4.5 player now at 5.0 must play with no greater than a             4.0 player)

        • If a single NTRP level team, he/she must move up to the appropriate NTRP level or sit out the balance of that season depending on the section’s regulations. (A player on a combined             NTRP level team may also choose to move up if the Section allows.)

In the Mixed Division, all matches played up until the notification of the disqualification will be counted. Any match played at the disqualified level following notification of the disqualification will be counted as defaults for the individual team match of the disqualified player and 6-0, 6-0 wins for the opponents in those individual matches.

 

Year-End NTRP Ratings

 

A year-end rating, also known as a computer-rating, refers to a player’s rating generated by their participation in USTA League Adult Divisions of 18 & Over, 40 & Over or 55 & Over and other play as applicable during the course of a year, generally Nov. 1 – Oct. 31. The term “rating” is most often used to refer to a rating generated by this play but can also include USTA Sanctioned Tournament play and other leagues as determined by the Section. A year-end rating is an NTRP Level assigned at the conclusion of the league championship which reflects a player’s ability level determined by a mathematical algorithm. A player’s year-end rating, published each December, is used to determine which USTA League(s) they are eligible to participate in following year. Year-end ratings are valid for up to three years for players 59 or under or two years for players 60 and over or until another rating is generated. 

 

How many matches are required to generate a Year-End NTRP rating? 

A minimum of three “valid” matches in qualifying USTA Leagues or NTRP tournaments opted-in by your Section are needed to generate a year-end rating. A valid match is defined as a team match in which a majority of the individual matches played by the two competing teams have completed at least six games.

 

How does a player achieve an NTRP year-end rating? (Also in Definitions)

A player receives an NTRP year-end rating by playing at least three valid matches in Leagues or included Tournaments, or both. A valid match is defined as a team match in which a majority of the individual matches played by the two competing teams have completed at least six games.  

 

What is the USTA Rating Year? (Also in Definitions)

The USTA rating year is used to define the limits of data collection for the purpose of calculating a year-end rating for all participating players. It runs from the prior year’s ending collection date through the end of the last Adult 18 & Over, Adult 40 & Over and Adult 55 & Over National Championship. The exact date varies from year to year based on National Championship dates.

 

When are year-end ratings published?

Each year, year-end NTRP ratings are published in TennisLink on or around Dec. 1.

 

Which matches count toward my rating and which matches do not count toward my rating?

All USTA Leagues (i.e. 18 & Over, 40 & Over, 55 & Over, 65 & Over) are included in the year-end NTRP rating calculation. Mixed Doubles Division results will only have an effect on the ratings of players who play exclusively Mixed Doubles. Each Section has the option to include or exclude other adult leagues as well as NTRP tournaments. Ladders, non-sanctioned leagues and non-sanctioned tournament results shall not be used to produce year-end ratings.

 

How does the year-end NTRP calculation work?  (Also in Definitions)

Computerized ratings are affected by the score of the match as well as your partner’s and your opponent’s dynamic NTRP rating. Based on player dynamic ratings at the start of a match, the NTRP algorithm expects a particular outcome of a match. The actual outcome is then compared to the expected outcome and, as a result, a player’s dynamic rating adjusts up or down (or there is no change, if the outcome was as expected.)  Computerized ratings are not directly affected by what position you played, your actual number of wins and losses, age, or team standing.

 

 

How does winning and losing affect my rating? (Also in Dynamic, Disqualification)

All matches have expected outcomes that vary depending on the dynamic NTRP ratings of the players on the court.  If you win or lose by the expected outcome, it will have a much smaller effect on your rating than if you win or lose by a margin that is greater than expected. It’s possible to lose a match and have your rating go up.  It’s also possible to win a match and have your rating go down.

 

How long does it take for a player’s NTRP level to move up or down based upon their match results?

There is not a definitive answer to this question. Every player has a different set of results against different opponents, so it is impossible to state exactly how long it takes for a player’s NTRP level to move up or down.

 

Is there a difference between a dynamic rating and a year-end rating?  (Also in Dynamic)

Dynamic ratings are not disclosed to players, whereas year-end ratings are published annually at NTRP levels. Dynamic ratings are calculated to the one-hundredth of a point, whereas year-end ratings are published in .5 increments.

 

If a player is disqualified by an NTRP Grievance that was upheld, do the matches played count toward the ratings of their opponents? (Also in Disqualification)

No.

 

If a player is dynamically disqualified and the matches reversed, do the matches played count toward the ratings of their opponents? (Also in Disqualification)

Yes.

 

How do matches against self-rated players affect my rating? (Also in Dynamic and Self-Rate)

Self-rated players will not impact your dynamic rating unless they have generated sufficient dynamic ratings.  These matches will be included at year-end when the final calculations are run.  

 

Can I be NTRP disqualified if I have a valid computer rating? (Also in Disqualification) 

No, however players whose year-end ratings have been reduced through appeal actions are subject to NTRP Dynamic Disqualification. A "C" rated player who had just started (formerly self-rated) in an Early Start League can also be promoted.   

 

NTRP DYNAMIC DISQUALIFICATION

 

Each NTRP Level is followed by a letter indicating the type of rating.  

 

The following identifies who can and cannot be NTRP dynamically disqualified.

 

Who cannot be NTRP dynamically disqualified?

NTRP Level followed by the letter below:

   - C Computer Rated Players *

    - M Mixed Exclusive Players **

    - T Tournament Players **

Exceptions:

* Players who entered an Early Start League at an NTRP Level lower than their current year-end rating are subject to NTRP dynamic disqualification or promotion

** Year-end (M) and (T) rated players are required to self-rate to enter the Adult Division, automatically become (S) rated players and therefore become subject to NTRP dynamic disqualification.

 

Who can be NTRP dynamically disqualified?  Participants in the Adult Division:

NTRP Level followed by the letter below:

    - A Appealed – all granted appeals including Medical and Promoted Players 60 or Over

    - S Self-rated Players

    - D Dynamic or NTRP Grievance Disqualified Players

    - C Exceptions to C year-end ratings as noted above *

 

How can I improve my rating?   

The best way to improve your rating is to practice, take lessons and work on your game, including improving your strokes, fitness and mental aspects of the game. Improving your rating is done by exceeding the expected outcome of your matches. Since the expected outcomes are not published, it is impossible to know whether a specific result helped or hurt your rating.  

 

Will it help me to move up if I play up?  

It is a common myth that playing up will make it easier to move up. This is not true. Players who are competitive at the next level, have a similar likelihood of moving up whether they play up and have some close matches as they would playing in-level and having better results.  

 

Why did my year-end rating move back down (or back up) when I had successfully appealed my rating up toward the end of last season?  (Also in Appeals)

When players successfully appeal their rating, it moves them to that level but has a negligible effect on the year-end calculation. If the appeal took place late in the season and no matches were played after that point, the appeal still has no effect on the year-end rating.

 

How close is my rating to the next level? (Also in Appeals)

The USTA doesn’t publish player dynamic NTRP ratings, only NTRP levels. Dynamic ratings in hundredths are not available to players. The USTA is aware of other sites that suggest they provide NTRP ratings and/or player statistics and skill analysis. Any alleged NTRP related information available on these other sites is not endorsed by the USTA, is not accurate and cannot be relied upon.

 

My partner / teammate appealed to move up and was granted; why was my appeal denied?  (Also in Appeals)

Even if players are in the same NTRP level, they can have a different rating in hundredths for their start rate. If they had any matches against different opponents, that would also cause deviation between their ratings in hundredths. Appeals of year-end ratings are denied if they do not meet the appeal criteria.

 

How did my partner move up, but I did not when we played all or most of our matches together?

If you and your partners were to start the season with the same start rating (start rate – a player’s previous valid year-end rating in hundredths) and ONLY play all your matches together, you would have the same NTRP rating at year end. If your start rating was different or if there are any matches that were not played together, the end result will be different.

 

How did some of the players that I beat end up moving up, but I did not?

Players have an entirely different set of results from one another. If you beat someone who moved up, it is likely that your match rating for that particular match was a number that moved you upward. Overall, your rating could be higher now than it was previously, but it did not move high enough to place you in the next level.

 

How many players are moved up and down each year?

The exact number of players that move up or down each year can vary.  

 

I thought more players would have been moved up/down than what I am seeing. 

The majority of players do not move up or down.

 

My record was similar or better than my partner(s) / My record was better than someone else who moved up, so why didn’t I move up too? / I had a very good win-loss record, so why didn’t my rating move up?  (Also in Appeals)

Win-loss records do not directly affect the year-end calculation. Your rating may have improved (in hundredths), but it may not have improved enough to move you into the next level. Even if players are in the same NTRP level, they can have a different start rating based on their year-end rating from the previous year. If they had any matches against different opponents, that would also cause deviation between their ratings in hundredths.

 

What does the letter after my rating mean? 

    - A – Appealed – all granted appeals including Medical and Promoted Players 60 or Over

    - S – Self-rated Players

    - C – Computer Rated Players

    - D – DQ Dynamic or NTRP Grievance Disqualified Players

    - M - Mixed Doubles Exclusive Players 

    - T – Tournament Exclusive Players

 

Do different positions/lines affect ratings differently?  In other words, does No. 1 singles count more for my rating that No. 3 doubles? 

No. Regardless of which position/line you play, your rating will be calculated using the score of the match and the rating of your opponent.  Since order of strength is not a requirement, it cannot be assumed that the stronger players will always be in the higher positions/lines.

 

If standings are based off of points per position, do the various positions affect ratings differently? 

No. Regardless of which position/line you play, your rating will be calculated based on the score of the match and the rating of your opponent. Your team may earn more points for team standings for higher positions. Sections or local areas decide how their standings will be determined.

 

Does a win against a Benchmark player help my rating more?

The USTA no longer publishes a B next to any ratings, but a player who competed in any level of championships may generate dynamics either higher or lower in the level.  It’s a matter of what the rating is of the player you played, not the fact that it is a benchmark player that will determine if the win helps your rating or not.  

 

Does a win by default affect my rating? 

No. A default does not affect the rating of any player listed on the scorecard for that match.

 

Who is responsible for calculating year-end NTRP ratings? 

All NTRP rating calculations are done at the USTA National level.

 

Do all tournaments count toward my rating? (Also in Tournament)

No. Currently, age-division tournaments are not included. Age-division tournaments are not included because they are open to all players of the specified age and are not restricted to skill level. Also, Sections have the ability to “Opt In” or “Opt Out” of NTRP Tournament results. Check with your Local League Coordinator or Section League Coordinator to obtain the information in your specific Section.   

 

Do tournament matches count more or less for my year-end rating than league matches? (Also in Tournament)

If a Section has opted to include tournament play in their NTRP ratings, tournament results count the same as league matches.

 

How do "Tournament Rankings" compare to ratings?  My “Tournament Ranking” had me ranked pretty high.  How does that correlate with my NTRP Rating? (Also in Tournament)

Tournament rankings are based on “points per round” in tournament play. A player could do very well in tournaments and achieve a high ranking but their ranking will have no bearing on their NTRP rating. 

Sections may opt IN or OUT of including sanctioned tournament results in their NTRP rating calculations. If a Section opts IN, NTRP sanctioned tournament matches are calculated into year-end ratings. In this case, tournament matches could have a direct effect on your rating.  Note: Being “ranked” high does not mean your rating will go up to the next level. It simply means that you received more “points” in the ranking criteria than other players. 

 

Can I use my Tournament rating to play in other Divisions?  (Also in Tournament)

A Tournament-exclusive rated player who chooses to participate in the USTA League Adult Division must self-rate in order to play. A Tournament-exclusive rating is not supported by any NTRP calculation data and is subject to NTRP grievances 

 

If I only play Mixed Doubles in Tournaments, what kind of a year-end rating will I achieve? (Also in Tournament)

You will receive an “M” rating if you only play Mixed Doubles. 

 

How does a Mixed-Exclusive player get a rating? (Also in Mixed)

If a sufficient number of Mixed Doubles matches are played, the player will receive a year-end mixed rating (M) that will be used as their NTRP play level for the next year for mixed league eligibility. 

 

Can I use my mixed-exclusive rating to play in other divisions? (Also in Mixed)

A mixed-exclusive (M) player must self-rate in order to join the Adult Division.  A mixed-exclusive rating is a minimum NTRP start level only, is not supported by any NTRP dynamic disqualification calculation data and is subject to NTRP grievance.

 

Is my Adult NTRP rating affected by playing Mixed Doubles?  (Also in Mixed)

Mixed Doubles Division results will only have an effect on the ratings of players who play exclusively Mixed Doubles.

 

I lost every match but didn’t move down.  I won every match but didn't move up.  Why is that? 

All matches have expected outcomes that vary depending on the dynamic ratings of the players on the court.  If you win or lose by the expected outcome, it will have a much smaller effect on your dynamic rating than if you win or lose by a margin that is greater than expected. It’s possible to lose a match and have your rating go up.  It’s also possible to win a match and have your rating go down.

 

My opponent was injured, so I won the match easily.  How will that affect my rating?

The score of the match would not reflect the expected outcome, so it could affect the ratings of the players on the court.

 

Why don't all players who played at USTA League National Championships get moved up?

Participants at national championships have a wide range of ratings. Playing at Nationals does not always correlate with moving up.

 

My match ended in a retirement, so does it count towards my NTRP rating?  

If a sufficient number of games are played, it will count toward ratings.  

 

 

Self-Rating

 

What is a self-rating?  (Also in Definitions)

A self rating is an entry-level rating generated upon a player, either a new player or a player re-entering the USTA League Adult Division with a M (mixed) or T (tournament) rating, completing the USTA Self-Rate Questionnaire. To participate in USTA League, all players must have a valid computer rating or self-rating. The USTA Self-Rate Questionnaire is available on TennisLink.com.

 

When and how do I get a self-rating?

If you don’t have a computer rating, you must self-rate before entering a USTA League program. To self-rate, go to tennislink.usta.com, on the navigation bar select USTA League. Below the heading “Find NTRP Rating Info” click the “self-rate” button. You do not need a membership or a team number to self-rate but you do need a USTA Account number.  

 

If you’re registering for a team, you’ll need a USTA Membership number, your team number and a major credit card. When you click “Register for a Team” you’ll be directed to the self-rate questionnaire. 

 

What dynamic rating does a self-rated player start with? (Also in Dynamic)

A self-rated player does not start with numerical dynamic rating.  The self-rate process is intended to place a player in a particular level.

 

I just played a player that has played USTA League before but they were self-rated?  How can that be?   

There are several possibilities:

    ● The player’s rating expired, requiring them to self-rate

    ● They previously self-rated but didn’t play enough matches to publish a year-end rating

    ● They had a M (mixed exclusive) or T (tournament exclusive) rating which required them to self-rate to play in the adult division.

 

Can’t someone lie when answering the questions to self-rate too low and win all their matches?

Yes. Unfortunately, some people, even though they are required to check a box certifying they answered the questions honestly, will lie in an effort to game the system. 

There are minimum rating levels for players with high school or college history. If you know a player with high school or college history who is rated too low, a captain or coordinator can file an NTRP grievance. In the Adult 18 & Over, 40 & Over and 55 & Over Divisions, a player’s dynamic rating is monitored on a daily basis. If they are playing well into the next level, they’ll receive a strike. Once they’ve received sufficient strikes, they will be moved to the higher level.

 

Can I declare a different self-rating for different Adult Divisions (e.g., 3.5 for Adult 18 & Over and 4.0 for Adult 40 & Over)? 

No. Once you declare an initial self-rating, you are bound by it for two years or until you generate a computer rating. 

 

What if I think a self-rated player has not rated himself or herself accurately?

On any given day, a player may play above or below his or her NTRP rating level. If you truly feel a self-rated player is significantly above level, a captain or coordinator may file an NTRP grievance. Contact your Local League coordinator.

 

What if I have self-rated, played four matches in the Adult 18 & Over Division, and then sign up for the Adult 40 & Over Division. Will I use my self-rating or will the system generate a computer rating for me?

The system will have a Dynamic NTRP rating from all of your Adult Division play. However, you will continue with the self-rating you selected until the year-end computer ratings are published; unless of course, you are disqualified and you then must immediately move up.

 

How do matches against self-rated players affect my rating? (Also in Dynamic and Year-End)

Self-rated players will not impact your dynamic rating unless they have generated sufficient dynamic ratings.  These matches will be included at year-end when the final calculations are run.  

 

How long is a self-rating valid?

A self-rating is valid for two years or until a computer-rating is generated.

 

Dynamic

 

What is a Dynamic rating? (Also in Definitions)

A dynamic rating is generated at the conclusion of a player's most recently completed USTA League Adult Division match. Dynamic ratings are calculated to the hundredths of a point and are not published. A dynamic rating may be calculated after each match and it may change with each match played.   Matches played against players that are self-rated do not generate dynamic ratings until a self-rated player has enough results from matches against other players who have dynamic ratings

 

Is there a difference between a dynamic rating and a year-end rating? (Also in Year-End)

Dynamic ratings are not disclosed to players, whereas year-end ratings are published annually at NTRP levels. Dynamic ratings are calculated to the one-hundredth of a point, whereas year-end ratings are published in .5 increments.

 

What is the dynamic rating range for each NTRP level? 

There are 50 data points for each NTRP level.  Example for the 3.5 level:  3.01, 3.02, 3.03, 3.49, 3.50 etc.

 

Does the dynamic calculation treat doubles partners differently? 

No, the dynamic calculation does not treat doubles partners differently. The system knows the players’ information and calculates the dynamics based on the opponent(s) dynamics and the scores. The effect of the outcome of the match is applied equally to both players.

 

Does a dynamic calculation apply to Mixed League play? (Also in Mixed and Disqualification).

Yes, for players who participate exclusively in the Mixed Division. Mixed results will not be included in year-end rating calculations for those who play a sufficient number of matches in any Adult Division.

 

When are dynamic ratings calculated?   

Dynamic ratings for local play are calculated nightly for the Adult Divisions. During championships, dynamic ratings can be run instantly as match results are entered.  Check with your Section to see if they run reports during the championships or if they run the reports after the championships.

 

What dynamic rating does a self-rated player start with?  (Also in Self-rate)

A self-rated player does not start with numerical dynamic rating.  The self-rate process is intended to place a player in a particular level.

 

Can my rating level change during the championship year?  (Also in Disqualification)    

Yes.  Dynamic ratings may fluctuate throughout the league year, but a player’s level will not be changed unless: 

    ● The player generates sufficient strikes. 

    ● The player is subject to an upheld NTRP League Grievance.  

    ● Year-End Ratings are calculated.

 

Am I able to see my dynamic rating?  

No. NTRP Ratings are only published at year end.

 

Does a Dynamic rating move above or below a player’s level? (Also in Disqualification) 

Yes.  Calculations are done nightly and a player’s dynamics can fluctuate up and down depending on their match play. 

 

Does the USTA share dynamic ratings? 

The USTA respects the privacy of member information and does not disclose dynamic ratings to the public.  While this information might be desirable to some, in other instances it could negatively affect player experience and/or ability to participate in the USTA League Program.  

 

Who can be NTRP dynamically disqualified?  (Also in Disqualification)   

Year-end Computer (C) Players, Mixed-Exclusive (M) Players, and Tournament (T) Players are not subject to NTRP Dynamic Disqualification. All other players who play in Adult Divisions are subject to NTRP Dynamic Disqualification.

 

Why would I be dynamically disqualified? (Also in Disqualification)  

A player can be dynamically disqualified when they have generated a sufficient amount of strikes due to entering the USTA League program at an NTRP level lower than their ability or by an upheld NTRP League Grievance. 

 

What are the consequences of NTRP Dynamic Disqualification? (Also in Disqualification)

In all cases, the player is disqualified from participation at that NTRP level in all USTA League programs. Each USTA Section determines which one of two methods they will follow at the local and the championship level. (Contact your Section League Coordinator to see what option your Section uses.) The effect on team standings may vary depending on when the NTRP Dynamic Disqualification occurs:

 

During local league:

In all cases, the player is disqualified from participation at that NTRP level. Each USTA Section will determine what matches, if any, will be reversed for the local season. 

 

During Championships:

Each Section must state before the championship event one of two methods for NTRP Dynamic Disqualification.

    1. Following completion of championship play: The player is disqualified from participation at that NTRP level for the balance of the year and the succeeding year. If the Section elects to     run the computer ratings following completion of the championships, match scores by the NTRP Dynamically Disqualified player will stand.

    2. Throughout championship play: If the Section elects to run calculations throughout the championship event, the player will be disqualified from participation at that NTRP level for     the balance of the year and the succeeding year.

 

Round-Robin format: 

Throughout the championship event, any player who reaches the NTRP Dynamic Disqualification criteria will have all matches at that NTRP level reversed to 0-6, 0-6.

 

Single-Elimination format: 

Throughout the championship event, the last match played by the NTRP Dynamically Disqualified player at that NTRP level will be reversed to 0-6, 0-6. 

 

What is a strike and how do I get one? (Also in Disqualification)

Each time an eligible player’s dynamic rating exceeds the maximum tolerance for the level, he or she automatically earns a "strike."

 

 

How high can my dynamic rating go before I earn a “strike”? (Also in Disqualification)

The Dynamic NTRP system allows a certain tolerance for player improvement—more for lower-level players where rapid improvement is more likely; less for higher-level players. The specific improvement factor is not published because of concerns that individuals, captains or others may attempt to manage their ratings.

 

Will I be notified if I earn a “strike”? (Also in Disqualification)

No. Notice occurs only after three strikes are accumulated. Players often receive one or two strikes and never get the third. To needlessly worry or prevent a player from participating based on the possibility of getting a strike is not fair to the player or the team.

 

Will I be told exactly which matches earned me “three strikes”?  (Also in Disqualification) 

Yes. If not provided, the player can ask the Section League Coordinator or designee which matches earned the strikes. All matches played are visible in TennisLink.

 

Who is notified in the event of a disqualification? By whom? How quickly?  (Also in Disqualification)

Responsibility for monitoring dynamic ratings lies with the Section League Coordinator or designee. When a "third strike" situation arises, the Section League Coordinator or designee will first notify:

    1. The player’s team captain, using the captain’s e-mail address as reported in TennisLink;

    2. The affected player, by telephone, e-mail or voicemail message, and

    3. The relevant District and Local League Coordinator.

Notification is made as soon as possible once a third strike has been received.

 

If I receive a third strike while participating in another division, but following the conclusion of my Section Championship for a given year and Division, will I be allowed to advance to Nationals if otherwise qualified?  (Also in Disqualification)

No. The one exception is if you are playing in a league using combined ratings (Mixed Doubles or Adult 55 & Over). As long as the player's (at the new NTRP level of play) and his or her partner's combined ratings do not exceed the NTRP level of your team, the player will be allowed to continue to play on that team.

 

The rules state that NTRP Dynamic Disqualification does not apply to the Mixed Division. If I am dynamically disqualified in the Adult Division, am I allowed to participate at the disqualified level in Mixed Division for the remainder of the League Year? (Also in Mixed and Disqualification)

No. Even though the Mixed Division does not allow NTRP Dynamic Disqualification, it must follow the rules in relation to playing at the correct level. A player who has been moved up as a result of a disqualification in the Adult Division must immediately adjust his/her NTRP level of play in the Mixed Division. The player will have two options:

    ● If a combined NTRP level team, he/she may continue on that team by adjusting the levels. (9.0 combined team—disqualified 4.5 player now at 5.0 must play with no greater than a 4.0     player)

    ● If a single NTRP level team, he/she must move up to the appropriate NTRP level or sit out the balance of that season depending on the section’s regulations. (A player on a combined     NTRP level team may also choose to move up if the Section allows.)

In the Mixed Division, all matches played up until the notification of the disqualification will be counted. Any match played at the disqualified level following notification of the disqualification will be counted as defaults for the individual team match of the disqualified player and 6-0, 6-0 wins for the opponents in those individual matches.

 

Do USTA sanctioned tournaments count in the dynamic rating system? If so, can a tournament win be used as one of the three “strikes”? (Also in Tournaments) 

Each Section has the option of including NTRP tournament results for year-end calculations. Sanctioned NTRP tournament results do not generate strikes; however, if your Section does Opt In, they will impact your year-end rating. 

 

How does winning and losing affect my rating? (Also in Year-End, Disqualification)

All matches have expected outcomes that vary depending on the dynamic NTRP ratings of the players on the court.  If you win or lose by the expected outcome, it will have a much smaller effect on your rating than if you win or lose by a margin that is greater than expected. It’s possible to lose a match and have your rating go up.  It’s also possible to win a match and have your rating go down.

 

How do matches against self-rated players affect my rating?  (Also in Year-End and Self-Rate)

Self-rated players will not impact your dynamic rating unless they have generated sufficient dynamic ratings.  These matches will be included at year end when the final calculations are run.  

 

Disqualification (DQ)

 

What is a Disqualified Rating (D)? (Also in Definitions)

This represents Dynamic or NTRP Grievance Disqualified Players.

 

What is a NTRP Disqualification? (Also in Definitions)

 

A dynamic disqualification is defined as a self-rated player that has generated three dynamic ratings in a single calendar year, based on USTA League Adult Division play (except retirements and through to Sectional Championships), that are clearly above their current computer-rating level, regardless of the championship year in which the matches take place. An NTRP Grievance is a formal written complaint regarding an alleged violation of a regulation or procedure. (from regulations). Players that receive an NTRP Grievance will receive a disqualified rating.

 

What is an NTRP Promotion? (Also in Definitions)

If a self-rated player competes at a higher level, they will be disqualified from their self-rated level and moved up to the higher level of competition. No other penalties will be imposed. 

 

Who can be NTRP dynamically disqualified?  (Also in Dynamic)

Year-end Computer (C) Players, Mixed-Exclusive (M) Players, and Tournament (T) Players are not subject to NTRP Dynamic Disqualification. All other players who play in Adult Divisions are subject to NTRP Dynamic Disqualification.

 

Does a Dynamic rating move above or below a player’s level? (Also in Dynamic) 

Yes.  Calculations are done nightly and a player’s dynamics can fluctuate up and down depending on their match play. 

 

Why would I be dynamically disqualified? (Also in Dynamic)

A player can be dynamically disqualified when they have generated a sufficient amount of strikes due to entering the USTA League program at an NTRP level lower than their ability or by an upheld NTRP League Grievance. 

 

If a player is disqualified by an NTRP Grievance that was upheld, do the matches played count toward the ratings of their opponents? (Also in Year-End)

No.

 

If a player is dynamically disqualified and the matches reversed, do the matches played count toward the ratings of their opponents? (Also in Year-End)

Yes.

 

Can I be disqualified if I have a valid computer rating? (Also in Year-End)

No, however players whose year-end ratings have been reduced through appeal actions are subject to NTRP Dynamic Disqualification. A "C" rated player who had just started (formerly self-rated) in an Early Start League can also be promoted.   

 

NTRP DYNAMIC DISQUALIFICATION

 

Each NTRP Level is followed by a letter indicating the type of rating.  

 

The following identifies who can and cannot be NTRP dynamically disqualified.

 

Who cannot be NTRP dynamically disqualified?

NTRP Level followed by the letter below:

    - C Computer Rated Players *

    - M Mixed Exclusive Players **

     - T Tournament Players **

Exceptions:

* Players who entered an Early Start League at an NTRP Level lower than their current year-end rating are subject to NTRP dynamic disqualification.

 

** Year-end (M) and (T) rated players are required to self-rate to enter the Adult Division, automatically become (S) rated players and therefore become subject to NTRP dynamic disqualification.

 

Who can be NTRP dynamically disqualified?  Participants in the Adult Division:

NTRP Level followed by the letter below:

    - A Appealed – all granted appeals including Medical and Promoted Players 60 or Over

     - S Self-rated Players

    - D Dynamic or NTRP Grievance Disqualified Players

    - C Exceptions to C year-end ratings as noted above *

Players participating in the Adult Division who are promoted as a result of NTRP dynamic disqualification will be immediately required to participate at their new NTRP level in all USTA League Programs. 

 

How high can my dynamic rating go before I earn a “strike”? (Also in Dynamic)

The Dynamic NTRP system allows a certain tolerance for player improvement—more for lowerlevel players where rapid improvement is more likely; less for higher-level players. The specific improvement factor is not published because of concerns that individuals, captains or others may attempt to manage their ratings.

 

Will I be notified if I earn a “strike”? (Also in Dynamic)

No. Notice occurs only after three strikes are accumulated. Players often receive one or two strikes and never get the third. To needlessly worry or prevent a player from participating based on the possibility of getting a strike is not fair to the player or the team.

 

Will I be told exactly which matches earned me “three strikes”?  (Also in Dynamic)

Yes. If not provided the player can ask the Section League Coordinator or designee which matches earned the strikes. All matches played are visible in TennisLink.

 

Who is notified in the event of a disqualification? By whom? How quickly? (Also in Dynamic)

Responsibility for monitoring dynamic ratings lies with the Section League Coordinator or designee. When a "third strike" situation arises, the Section League Coordinator or designee will first notify:

    1. The player’s team captain, using the captain’s e-mail address as reported in TennisLink;

    2. The affected player, by telephone, e-mail or voicemail message, and

    3. The relevant District and Local League Coordinator.

Notification is made as soon as possible once a third strike has been received.

 

Does a dynamic calculation apply to Mixed League play? (Also in Mixed and Dynamic).

Yes, for players who participate exclusively in the Mixed Doubles Division. Mixed results will not be included in year-end rating calculations for those who play a sufficient number of matches in any Adult Division.

 

If I receive a third strike while participating in another division, but following the conclusion of my Section Championship for a given year and Division, will I be allowed to advance to Nationals if otherwise qualified?  (Also in Dynamics)

No. The one exception is if you are playing in a league using combined ratings (Mixed Doubles or Adult 55 & Over). As long as the player's (at the new NTRP level of play) and his or her partner's combined ratings do not exceed the NTRP level of your team, the player will be allowed to continue to play on that team.

 

Do USTA sanctioned tournaments count in the dynamic rating system? If so, can a tournament win be used as one of the three “strikes”? (Also in Tournaments and Dynamic)

Each Section has the option of including NTRP tournament results for year-end calculations. Sanctioned NTRP tournament results do not generate strikes; however, if your Section does Opt In, they will impact your year-end rating. 

 

Can my rating level change during the championship year? (Also in Dynamic)

Yes.  Dynamic ratings may fluctuate throughout the league year, but a player’s level will not be changed unless 

    ● The player generates sufficient strikes. 

    ● The player is subject to an upheld NTRP League Grievance.  

    ● Year-End Ratings are calculated.

 

What are the consequences of NTRP Dynamic Disqualification?  (Also in Dynamic)

In all cases, the player is disqualified from participation at that NTRP level in all USTA League programs. Each USTA Section determines which one of two methods they will follow at the local and the championship level. (Contact your Section League Coordinator to see what option your Section uses.) The effect on team standings may vary depending on when the NTRP Dynamic Disqualification occurs:

 

During local league:

In all cases, the player is disqualified from participation at that NTRP level. Each USTA Section will determine what matches, if any, will be reversed for the local season. 

 

During Championships:

Each Section must state before the championship event one of two methods for NTRP Dynamic Disqualification.

    1. Following completion of championship play: The player is disqualified from participation at that NTRP level for the balance of the year and the succeeding year. If the Section elects to     run the computer ratings following completion of the championships, match scores by the NTRP Dynamically Disqualified player will stand.

    2.  Throughout championship play: If the Section elects to run calculations throughout the championship event, the player will be disqualified from participation at that NTRP level for     the balance of the year and the succeeding year.

 

Round-Robin format: 

Throughout the championship event, any player who reaches the NTRP Dynamic Disqualification criteria will have all matches at that NTRP level reversed to 0-6, 0-6.

 

Single-Elimination format: 

Throughout the championship event, the last match played by the NTRP Dynamically Disqualified player at that NTRP level will be reversed to 0-6, 0-6.

 

If I am NTRP Dynamically Disqualified during the Adult Local league, what happens to my matches in other Divisions?

    ● If a local NTRP Dynamic Disqualification occurs during concurrent local Adult USTA League seasons, the disqualifications shall affect the matches played by the disqualified player in     both Divisions.

    ● If the seasons are not concurrent or overlapping, the NTRP disqualification shall affect the matches played by the disqualified player in the season in which the NTRP Dynamic     Disqualification occurred.

    ● Each Section determines the penalties to be imposed for NTRP Dynamic Disqualifications.

 

Why are all scores reversed in some sections?  This doesn't seem fair to our team.

Players who have been dynamically disqualified reflect skills in a higher NTRP level than they are competing so their team had an unfair advantage to all of their opponents.

 

Is there a rating professional or someone who can observe this player to support our claim that he/she should not be disqualified?

For consistency and fairness, all players are judged by the dynamic calculations and not human beings.

 

How does winning and losing affect my rating? (Also in Year-End, Dynamics) 

All matches have expected outcomes that vary depending on the dynamic NTRP ratings of the players on the court.  If you win or lose by the expected outcome, it will have a much smaller effect on your rating than if you win or lose by a margin that is greater than expected. It’s possible to lose a match and have your rating go up.  It’s also possible to win a match and have your rating go down.

 

The rules state that NTRP Dynamic Disqualification does not apply to the Mixed Division. If I am dynamically disqualified in the Adult Division, am I allowed to participate at the disqualified level in Mixed Division for the remainder of the League Year? (Also in Mixed and Dynamic)

No. Even though the Mixed Division does not allow NTRP Dynamic Disqualification, it must follow the rules in relation to playing at the correct level. A player who has been moved up as a result of a disqualification in the Adult Division must immediately adjust his/her NTRP level of play in the Mixed Division. The player will have two options:

    ● If a combined NTRP level team, he/she may continue on that team by adjusting the levels. (9.0 combined team—disqualified 4.5 player now at 5.0 must play with no greater than a 4.0     player)

    ● If a single NTRP level team, he/she must move up to the appropriate NTRP level or sit out the balance of that season depending on the section’s regulations. (A player on a combined     NTRP level team may also choose to move up if the Section allows.)

 

In the Mixed Division, all matches played up until the notification of the disqualification will be counted. Any match played at the disqualified level following notification of the disqualification will be counted as defaults for the individual team match of the disqualified player and 6-0, 6-0 wins for the opponents in those individual matches.

 

 

Appeals

 

What is an Appealed Rating (A)? (Also in Definitions)

A player receives an appealed rating when they are granted a request to play at a higher or lower level of play. Types of appeals include: medical appeals, automatic appeals and committee reviewed appeals.

 

How can I appeal my rating? 

Appeal on TennisLink under: "FIND NTRP RATING INFORMATION" (year-end rating only)

 

Who can appeal automatically through TennisLink?

    ● Computer rated players—Up or Down  

    ● Mixed Exclusive players—Up or Down  

    ● Self-rated players—Up

There is no further appeal if you are denied.

 

Who can appeal on TennisLink when registering for a team? 

    ● Computer rated players—Down

    ● Mixed Exclusive players—Down

 

What appeals must be referred/heard by Section administration or their designee?

    ● Self-rated players who wish to move DOWN

    ● All medical appeals

Each section also provides directions, deadlines and any related fee on their website.

 

I appealed my rating online and it was granted, but I did it inadvertently.  Can it be changed back?

No. Do not attempt to appeal your rating unless you are sure you want to have it changed. If an auto appeal is granted in error, contact your Section League Coordinator.  

 

Is there a way to know if my appeal will be granted or not without appealing it online?

No. The only way to find out if your rating is within the appeal range is to go to tennislink.com and appeal your rating. Make sure you want to appeal before you go through the process.

 

My pro says my rating is higher than what the computer says. Can my rating be adjusted based on what my pro is telling me or can someone hit with me to see if my rating can be adjusted? 

Teaching professionals have a general sense of how someone may compete at various NTRP levels. This enables them to help connect new players with other players who may have a compatible style of play. However, they are not trained by the USTA to accurately assess someone’s exact NTRP rating. Ratings are based on match results – not how well someone can hit their strokes or play points during a lesson.  In addition, a formal visual verification process is no longer recognized by the USTA. 

 

Why did my year-end rating move back down (or back up) when I had successfully appealed my rating up toward the end of last season?  (Also in Year-End)

When players successfully appeal their rating, it moves them to that level but has a negligible effect on the year-end calculation. If the appeal took place late in the season and no matches were played after that point, the appeal still has no effect on the year-end rating.

 

How close is my rating to the next level?  (Also in Year-End) 

Dynamic ratings in one-hundredths are not available to players.  The USTA is aware of other sites that suggest they provide NTRP ratings and/or player statistics and skill analysis. Any alleged NTRP related information available on these other sites is not endorsed by the USTA, is not accurate and cannot be relied upon.

 

What is the rule regarding players who are over 60, relating to year-end ratings?   

According to USTA Regulation 2.05E(1),  any player who is 60 years of age or older prior to, or during, the calendar year in which such player plays his or her first local league match and has achieved the same rating level or lower for his or her three most recent year-end ratings, without benefit of appeal of the player’s year-end rating, will be granted an appeal ("A" rating) if promoted. NTRP Dynamic Disqualification procedures as outlined in Reg. 2.04B(3) apply.

 

What is the rule regarding players who are over 65, relating to year-end ratings?   

According to USTA Regulation 2.05E(2), all players age 65 or over, if promoted, will automatically be granted an appeal (“A” rating) of their current rating back to their previous valid year-end rating. NTRP Dynamic Disqualification procedures as outlined in Reg. 2.04B(3) apply.

 

I was injured while I played last year, but have recovered now. Can I file a medical appeal to move up? 

Medical appeals are only considered for players who want to move down due to a permanently disabling injury or illness. It is recommended that you log onto to TennisLink and use the auto appeal option to move up. If your auto appeal up is denied, in this special circumstance, you may contact your Section League Coordinator.

 

My partner / teammate appealed to move up and was granted, but my appeal was denied.  (Also in Year-End)     

Even if players are in the same NTRP level, they can have a different rating in hundredths for their start rate. If they had any matches against different opponents, that would also cause deviation between their ratings in hundredths. Appeals of year-end ratings are denied if they do not meet the appeal criteria.

 

My record was similar or better than my partner(s) / My record was better than someone else who moved up, so why didn’t I move up too? / I had a very good win-loss record, so why didn’t my rating move up?  (Also in Year- End)

Win-loss records do not directly affect the year-end calculation. Your rating may have improved (in hundredths), but it may not have improved enough to move you into the next level. Even if players are in the same NTRP level, they can have a different start rating based on their year-end rating from the previous year. If they had any matches against different opponents, that would also cause deviation between their ratings in hundredths.

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