This is the membership endpoints html.
Client Id
Client Secret
PB Error Codes
getcategories
getproducts
accesstoken
catalogId
catalogVersionId
categoryId
viewCart
deleteCart
addToCart
retrieveMembersDetails
getMemberInfo
unlinkMember
submitNewMemberInfo
updateCustomerDetails
traditionalUpdateCustomerDetails
paymentDetails
createOrganization
addFacility
addVoucher
removeVoucher
validateAddress
setDefaultPayment
getOrganization
orders
organizationSuggestion
facilitySuggestion
deleteCard
resetPassword
signInByUaid
recoveryEmail
customerEmailUpdate
traditionalLogin
signInByProfile
updateSignInProfile
addCard
addEcheck
removeEcheck
setDefaultPaymentInfo
unsubscribe
editFacility
unlinkFacility
editOrganization
duplicateCustomerValidation
getSection
refreshToken
National

ASIAN-AMERICAN SPOTLIGHT:

GRACE MIN

E.J. Crawford  |  May 25, 2017
<h2>ASIAN-AMERICAN SPOTLIGHT:</h2>
<h1>GRACE MIN</h1>
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May is Asian Pacific-American Heritage Month. To celebrate, USTA.com is taking a look at Asian-Americans past, present and future – those who have helped to shape the game, and those who could soon cement their place in it.
 
Here’s a closer look at former US Open junior champion and Top 100 contender Grace Min:

 

  • Min was a junior standout, winning the US Open girls’ singles title and the Wimbledon girls’ doubles crown (with Eugenie Bouchard) in 2011, when she climbed to No. 4 in the world junior rankings.

  • Min made her Grand Slam debut by qualifying for the 2013 French Open. She also competed in that year’s US Open and again at both events in 2014. She also competed in the main draw of the Australian Open in 2015.

  • She climbed to a career-best No. 97 in the world in March 2015, on the heels of reaching the second round of the WTA tournament in Rio and buoyed by a semifinal showing at the tour event in Bad Gastein, Austria, in 2014.

  • The 23-year-old holds eight career USTA Pro Circuit singles titles, including two in 2016. ADVERTISEMENT Also last year, she reached the final at the $50,000 events in Waco, Texas, and Sacramento, Calif.

  • Min's parents emigrated from Korea to the U.S. in the 1980s, and she spoke only Korean until starting school. Her parents and older brother all live in Atlanta, where Grace was born. She currently lives in Florida and trains at the USTA National Campus.

  • Min on Asian Pacific-American Heritage Month: "It's very special to me that there's a month dedicated to my background, my heritage, because growing up a lot of that wasn't recognized."



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