This is the membership endpoints html.
Client Id
Client Secret
PB Error Codes
getcategories
getproducts
accesstoken
catalogId
catalogVersionId
categoryId
viewCart
deleteCart
addToCart
retrieveMembersDetails
getMemberInfo
unlinkMember
submitNewMemberInfo
updateCustomerDetails
traditionalUpdateCustomerDetails
paymentDetails
createOrganization
addFacility
addVoucher
removeVoucher
validateAddress
setDefaultPayment
getOrganization
orders
organizationSuggestion
facilitySuggestion
deleteCard
resetPassword
signInByUaid
recoveryEmail
customerEmailUpdate
traditionalLogin
signInByProfile
updateSignInProfile
addCard
addEcheck
removeEcheck
setDefaultPaymentInfo
unsubscribe
editFacility
unlinkFacility
editOrganization
duplicateCustomerValidation
getSection
refreshToken
National

How does a racquet’s size

affect my strokes?

Courtesy of TENNIS Magazine  |  June 5, 2017
<h2><b>How does a racquet’s size</b></h2>
<h1>affect my strokes?</h1>
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Head size – the size of the area where the strings are – is by and large provided in square inches. The smaller the head, the more maneuverable and control-oriented the racquet will be; the bigger the head, the more margin for error and power a racquet will have. Most beginners should use a racquet with a head size between 100 and 115 sq. inches – consider the smaller end of the spectrum if you’re coordinated and/or looking to develop long, fluid swings through practice and lessons.

 

The racquet’s weight is usually given in ounces. Generally speaking, a light racquet will be more maneuverable; a heavy racquet will be more stable. Beginners should choose a racquet that weighs somewhere between 9.5 and 11 ounces – on the heavier end if you’re strong or relatively athletic.

 

The racquet length is measured from the cap of its handle to the top of its head. ADVERTISEMENT Longer racquets, the theory goes, give you more leverage on serves and greater reach on volleys; shorter racquets are more maneuverable. Until you’ve played long enough to know what your strengths and weaknesses are – and what you need from your racquet – it’s best to play with a racquet with a standard 27-inch length.

 

For more on the latest gear and tennis technology, visit TENNIS.com.

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