This is the membership endpoints html.
Client Id
Client Secret
PB Error Codes
getcategories
getproducts
accesstoken
catalogId
catalogVersionId
categoryId
viewCart
deleteCart
addToCart
retrieveMembersDetails
getMemberInfo
unlinkMember
submitNewMemberInfo
updateCustomerDetails
traditionalUpdateCustomerDetails
paymentDetails
createOrganization
addFacility
addVoucher
removeVoucher
validateAddress
setDefaultPayment
getOrganization
orders
organizationSuggestion
facilitySuggestion
deleteCard
resetPassword

Tennis Grips:

Synthetic vs. Leather

Courtesy of TENNIS Magazine  |  June 12, 2017
<h2>Tennis Grips:</h2>
<h1>Synthetic vs. Leather</h1>
ADVERTISEMENT

Many professionals, including Roger Federer, prefer wrapping an overgrip over leather. The advantage of the material is, by and large, its increased feedback. When compared to synthetic fibers, leather yields a firmer, more traditional sensation, allowing players to better feel the bevels (i.e., edges) of the handle – a boon for quick, accurate grip changes. Furthermore, leather permits more frame and handle vibrations to travel through the palette into the hand, which for some players translates into greater “feel,” or awareness of what has transpired upon impact.

 

What would you stand to lose? Comfort, mainly. Leather is not the most forgiving material, and those accustomed to playing with softer, more shock-absorbing grips may find their hands tire more quickly. (And for players who do not use an overgrip, leather isn't nearly as tacky as modern synthetics.)

ADVERTISEMENT

 

One last note: If you switch over to leather, expect your racquets to increase in weight about 10 grams, depending on the brand of grip and how it’s wrapped. Given the location of the weight change, you may also find that your racquet swings a bit more head-light through the air.

 

For more on the latest gear and tennis technology, visit TENNIS.com.
 

ADVERTISEMENT

Related Articles

SIGN UP FOR THE USTA NEWSLETTER