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National

WHAT'S THE CALL?

DROPPING YOUR RACQUET

March 14, 2019
<h2>WHAT'S THE CALL?</h2>
<h1>DROPPING YOUR RACQUET</h1>
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Have you ever had a dispute with a fellow player over a call on the court that you couldn’t settle? Maybe you’re just curious about how some scenarios, from the common to the ridiculous, are resolved.



Question: During a rally, my partner dropped her racquet so I took over and continued playing the point. After a long rally, I finally hit a winner down the alley. Our opponents refused to give us the point because they said that as soon as my partner dropped her racquet, a let should’ve been called, and we should’ve replayed the point. Is that true?

 

Answer: You might want to start encouraging your teammate to drop her racquet more often if you can fend off a rally against your opponents on your own. (DISCLAIMER: Seriously, don’t do this.)

 

While you were able to fend off one point by yourself, doing it all the time is probably not a game-winning strategy. ADVERTISEMENT A player’s racquet coming out of the hand (or if their shoe comes off), is not the basis for either player/teams claiming a let. A let is never authorized for something within the player's control. (Code 36) 
 

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For the "Friend at Court" handbook and more information on the rules of tennis, visit the rules and regulations homepage.

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